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Indiana Map - 1832

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INDIANA 1832

 

 

 

 

Reprinted 2001 by Michiana History Publications

 

This inexpensive reprint is  a best seller at our genealogy conferences.

Lithographed on 80 pound archival stock, and protected by a mylar sleeve,  this 11" x 14" reproduction makes  a great gift for friends and family or can be  an unusual door prize at family reunions or genealogy meetings.     One local historical society even framed all of our reprints and displays them on their wall.

 The back of each map provides information about the map and its publisher as well as historical information about the state at the time of the map's publication.

This wonderful map is the first to show both St. Joseph and Elkhart counties, which were established in 1830, in northern Indiana.

Most of Indiana was developed from the southern end of the state, showing the strong influence of Kentucky, Virginia and southern Ohio pioneers.

However, both St. Joseph and Elkhart counties were developed by pioneers from New England, New York, Pennsylvania and the northern part of Ohio. Pioneers followed the Erie Canal as far as Ohio, then either continued on land to Toledo and Vistula, Ohio or took lake passage for Detroit, Michigan. Many followed the Detroit to Chicago Road (commonly known as the Chicago Road) and dropped off at convenient places in Indiana. Both the Vistula Road and the Chicago Road crossed the St. Joseph River, which began in Hillsdale, Michigan and emptied in Lake Michigan at what later became the towns of Benton Harbor and St. Joseph, Michigan. In the early days most of the river was easily navigatable by paddle boats.

This map comes from Anthony Finley's A New General Atlas, Comprising a Complete Set of maps, representing the Grand Divisions of the Globe, Together with the several Empires, Kingdoms, and States in the World; Compiled from the Best Authorities, and corrected by the Most Recent Discoveries, published in Philadelphia in 1832. The engraving was done by Young and Delleker.

Not much is known about Anthony Finley, but it is known that he produced atlases as early as 1818 and employed talented Philadelphia engravers such as Henry S. Tanner, J. Vallance, and J. Thackara. Their work is considered to have been remarkable for their distinctiveness and elegance.


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